Wednesday, May 27, 2015

A Time Comes

Artist In Blue Dress in front of 70" Square Drawing Black & White, 2012


When the time comes for change, it is hard to accept.
Too much of me has been decomposing and The Paradigm for Beauty has essentially run dry.

This blog originated with a design that it would last forever, or at least until I left the planet. It was built with the intention that the articles would focus on creative improvised music and all its ancillary conditions. For the most part, my accomplishments have been achieved with an occasional offshoot into my real job which is my visual art and how it is exhibited and created.

But I have to stop writing for the blog because it is imperative that I direct my energies elsewhere.

The page will still exist because every post attracts readers. 

And I might post references from other sources regarding my art from time to time.

Please know, dear reader, that I regret having to write this post, for I have enjoyed the connection. 

I have to engage in the process of re-connecting to myself, discovering new phases of life and loves.

Thank you.  




Saturday, December 6, 2014

Top Ten, 2014




  • Darius Jones, Oversoul Manual, AUM Fidelity;
  • Joe McPhee, Glasses, Corbett & Dempsey;
  • Wadada Leo Smith, The Great Lakes Suite, TUM Records;
  • Chad Taylor & Rob Masurek, Locus, Northern Spy;
  • Jason Roebke Octet, High/Red/Center, Delmark;
  • Matthew Shipp Trio, Root of Things, Relative Pitch;
  • Dave Rempis, Darren Johnston, Larry Ochs, Spectral, Aerophonic Records;
  • Billy Bang & William Parker, Medicine Buddha, NoBusiness Recods
  • Darius Jones & Matthew Shipp, Cosmic Lieder: The Darkseid Recital, AUM Fidelity;


  • Jason Adasiewicz's SunRooms, From the Region, Delmark.
  • Monday, November 24, 2014

    Darius Jones: Oversoul Manual, AUM Fidelity, 2014

    Language involves more than words, spoken or written, acted out or signaled; it defines however information is transmitted. Language is the vehicle for codifying communication processes that lead to a greater purpose. Humans do it. Animals do it. Plants do it. All living beings do it.

    Alto sax player and composer Darius Jones is no stranger to how to shape language. From his very first quasi-autobiographical recording, Man’ish Boy, he has bridged the gap between the real and the imagined and literally made them indistinguishable. It is in the fourth recording that relates directly to the three before it, Oversoul Manual, that Jones is realizing the dream originating with the instrumental Man’ish Boy (AUMFidelity, 2010), continuing with Big Gurl (AUMFidelity, 2011) and Book of Mae’Bul (AUMFidelity, 2012).

    Oversoul Manual (AUMFidelity, 2014) is a step beyond the pure musical adaptation of Jones’ story. It is the magical celebration of the ancient language of Jones’ invention, ɶʃ, “…an empathic language by the Or’genian people.” That celebration conveys the guts of his story. Jones’ creativity envelops an entire culture of love, women, boys, compassion and identification with Universal Truths. For without the latter, how else can the purity of souls be known or even alluded to. Jones, himself, egolessly constructs the epicenter of the culture which penetrates the ether, the netherworld, the alien world, the earth world.

    A group of four women, Sarah Martin, Jean Carla Rodea, Amirtha Kidambi, and Kristin Slipp constitute “The Elizabeth-Caroline Unit.” This “spiritual unit,” as Jones describes it, vocalizes a cappella fifteen verses of ritualistic beauty whose force is directed towards the creation of a child. The music ushers in a process of birthing that happens within Jones’ world, the one that is the implosion of the real and the imagined into one.

    The texture of the vocalization manifests an epitome of harmonics; high and low pitch balance; broken and uninterrupted vibrations; open and closed tones; and singular and unison lines. No verse is translatable, only symbolic. The language is syllabic. No dictionary comes with the recording, because it does not matter.  This glorious, evocative, albeit mysterious continuum of sound projects an enlivening, audibly sensuous, often trance-like roadway to somewhere that is essentially nowhere, which exists exclusively in the heart.

    copyright 2014 Lyn Horton

     Track listing:

     


















    Personnel:

    Sarah Martin, voice; Jean Carla Rodea, voice; Amirtha Kidambi,voice; Kristin Slipp, voice.

    Cover Art:
    Copyright 2014 Randal Wilcox


    Wednesday, September 17, 2014

    Lyn Horton's Work: Interior Designer, Mary Douglas Drysdale: John Lyle Style Blog

    http://johnlylestyle.com/mary-douglas-drysdale/#more-2060



    Lyn Horton fills this clean white wall with energy. This cool space was done for DXV, American Standard as part of their new product launch. Humm, like the sound of Mary Douglas Drysdale for DXV…….


    Lyn Horton: Installation Shots: Cross MacKenzie Gallery, Georgetown, Washington, DC, September, 2014

    Rebecca Cross, owner of Cross MacKenzie Gallery, makes final lighting adjustment on Lyn Horton's work.



    Lyn Horton drawings: l: Three line characters, 2014; r: Strands, 2010.


    Lyn Horton drawings: l to r: Silver & Black, Gold & Black, Black & Silver, Black & Gold, 2014.

    Lyn Horton drawings: l to r: 25 Characters, 2014; (upper) Gold & Silver, (below) Silver & Gold, 2014;
    Maren Kloppmann ceramics: on pedestals.



    Lyn Horton: 70" Square Drawing Black & White, 2014.




    Lyn Horton drawings: l: 70" Square Drawing Black & White; r: White Characters, 2014.



    Lyn Horton drawings: 3 Sequential Series White & Black on Green & Rose 1-4, 2014.




    Lyn Horton drawings: l: (upper) Silver & Gold; (lower) Gold & Silver, 2014; r: Single Loopy Line, 7, 5, 3, 8, 2014. 



    Lyn Horton drawings: 9 White Characters, 2014.


    Enlarged Photo by Richard Laurie of Lyn Horton standing in front of one of her wall drawing installations in the window of Cross MacKenzie Gallery.


    Georgetown Gallery Scene Makes a Resurgence | The Georgetowner

    Georgetown Gallery Scene Makes a Resurgence | The Georgetowner